Image from Sit Less. Move More.
Make your move. Sit less. Be active for life. Message and image from the Australian Government.

Sit less. Move more.

That's the key message the Australian Government's health campaign wants us to follow because more than half of all Australian adults are simply not active enough.

More than one half. That's more than 9.5 million adults - a staggering number given that Australia is seen as a sporting nation but it turns out that we sit down far too much for our own good.

What are the key goals for adults 18-64 years of age?

  • Fit in 150 to 300 minutes of moderate physical activity or 75 to 150 minutes of vigorous activity or a combination of these levels of activity, each and every week
  • Do muscle strengthening activities at last 2 days each week
  • Sit down less
  • Break up long periods of sitting as often as possible

How about kids and older people? How does this message apply?

I've summarised the key messages for all ages from the campaign here.

Age range

 Active time each and every day

Screen time

Extra comments

 Link to brochure

0 to 12 months Allow natural safe movement, play and exploration when awake.

Zero screen time of any type. It is recommended that children under 12 months of age do not watch DVDs, TV, computer screens and other electronic games.

That means no to using the TV screen as an entertainment and a baby-sitting tool for babies. Zip, zilch, nil, none ... up to the age of 2 years!

Do not keep little kids inactive, sedentary or restrained for periods longer than one (1) hour at a time (except when sleeping!). Infants ought to be free to move and play safely according to their age.

What is restrained? It includes sitting in a high chair, stroller, car seat or capsule, supermarket trolley, or other restricting item.

Brochure here
1 to 2 years At least three (3) hours of activity each and every day. That's 180 minutes out of a day.  

Zero screen time of any type. It is recommended that children under 2 years of age do not watch DVDs, TV, computer screens and other electronic games.

That means no to using the TV screen as an entertainment and a baby-sitting tool for young kids.

Spread activity across the day. It doesn't have to be done in one big session. Brochure here
2 to 5 years At least three (3) hours of activity each and every day. That's 180 minutes out of a day. Limit all screen time to less than one (1) hour each day. Screen time include TV, DVD, computer screens (even 'educational toy ones), smart devices and electronic games  

Do not keep little kids inactive, sedentary or restrained for periods longer than one (1) hour at a time (except when sleeping!). Toddlers and children up to 5 years of age ought to be free to move and play.

Brochure here
5 to 17 years Include at least 60 minutes active time each day, upwards to 180 minutes. Limit leisure screen time to less than two (2) hours each day. Ready for the challenge!!

The more activity a child or teenager gets, upwards to three (3) hours daily, the better.

Include muscle and bone strengthening activities at least 3 days a week.

 

For ages 5 to 12 years

For ages 13 to 17 years

18 to 64 years 150 to 300 minutes of moderate physical activity each and every day No specific recommendation is made but research shows that people who keep their leisure screen time to less than an average of one (1) hour a day are better able to control their weight. If that's too much of a challenge, start to reduce your non-working hours' time to less than 3 hours daily. If you do vigorous activity, the time commitment drops to 75 to 150 minutes each day. Brochure here
above 64 years Aim for 30 minutes each day at a moderate level No recommendation is made but less screen time means more time for hobbies, activity and other stimulating interests Include strength building, balance and flexibility activities into your day. Brochure here

 

For more detail and ideas on how to 'Move more. Sit less' for adults and to make it happen, check out this link to an Australian Government Dept of Health pdf. The brochure gives you tips on how to get active. For access to the full age range, go to the Australian Government's page (click here).